Tag Archives: education

Mental health providers and other professionals often talk about a child or adult's "dysregulation" and "self-regulation," but these terms are often left undefined. A 2017 summary and the 2015 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services help define self-regulation and show the complex social, biological, and environmental factors involved in development of self-regulation.

The summary defines self-regulation as "the act of managing one’s thoughts and feelings to engage in goal-directed actions such as organizing behavior, controlling impulses, and solving problems constructively."

Components of self-regulation
Self-regulation is a term that refers to a number of essential capabilities for successful human functioning.

Being able to self-regulate helps us succeed in many aspects of life, including creating satisfying relationships, tolerating difficulty, prospering in school and work, managing finances, and maintaining physical and mental health. Self-regulation is a critical life skill. ...continue reading

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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attention deficit disorder (ADD) are common issues for both children and adults. Symptoms may include:

  • narrow focus on the present moment
  • lack of attention to details
  • lack of body awareness and control
  • prone to distraction
  • failure to consider the consequences of behavior
  • difficulty with organization
  • difficulty with sustained projects and following through with chores
  • impulsivity
  • frequent fidgeting or squirming
  • very active, difficulty sitting still
  • talking excessively
  • blurting out answers, not waiting their turn

Individuals with ADHD/ADD often perform poorly in school and in the workplace, even though they may be highly intelligent and creative. These attention issues are often inherited, with the condition appearing in multiple generations of the family.

The most common treatment for ADHD/ADD is medication, but when the medications are stopped, the condition returns. Neurofeedback can be a highly effective alternative because it allows the areas of the brain that control arousal and focus to learn how to self-regulate. Neurofeedback can improve school, sport, and work performance, as well as social skills and self esteem. Unlike medication, the effects of neurofeedback training are often lasting, although occasional "touch-ups" are sometimes necessary in order to maintain the progress.

In this video, a boy who had ADHD describes his experiences before and after training with neurofeedback.

Contact me, if you're wondering whether you or your child might benefit from neurofeedback brain training.

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I wrote this article for friends who have asked for advice or help in preparing for the exams that social workers must pass to become licensed. I’ve described the strategies I used in my own preparation, but I’d also encourage you to gather ideas from others who have taken the exam.

...continue reading

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Poverty may have many unexpected consequences. Being intensely preoccupied with the problems that arise when you don't have enough money for normal living expenses results in difficulties performing other complex tasks, according to a study by the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy at the University of Warwick in England.

Studies have found that poverty is associated with lower rates of accessing preventative health care, missed appointments, poor adherence to medication schedules, lower work productivity, less attentiveness to children, and worse financial management. ...continue reading

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