neurofeedback

By training the brain with EEG (electroencephalograph) neurofeedback, we can improve mood, behavior, and performance of the brain. Many varieties of neurofeedback can also help difficult issues, such as trauma and obsessions.

I've studied neurofeedback with Mike Cohen, a gifted teacher. In this simple video he explains how EEG neurofeedback works and how EEG neurofeedback can help you or your family member.

Like the EKG or ECG (electrocardiogram), which is used to show the electrical activity of the heart, the EEG shows the subtle electrical activity of the brain.

EEG neurofeedback is non-invasive, which means that it is not adding anything to your brain. It does NOT introduce any electrical charge to the brain or scalp. It is safe.

The EEG neurofeedback system simply reads what is happening with very sensitive sensors. The system then process this data and shows the brain feedback, usually using sounds and visuals, such as a movie. As this visual and sound feedback changes, the brain is receiving information about its own performance.

The visual and sound feedback helps the brain learn about its own changing behavior from moment to moment. This learning is actually the brain changing itself. The person watching the visual and sound feedback doesn't have to do anything. This is a game for the brain! The brain figures it out below the level of consciousness.

I also use pirHEG (passive infrared hemoencephalography), a different style of neurofeedback. Much of what Mike says about EEG neurofeedback applies to other forms of neurofeedback, like pirHEG, even though the feedback methods are quite different.

I offer neurofeedback in my Glen Burnie office. In some cases, I can also make visits to your home or office.

Contact me to learn more about whether neurofeedback could help you.

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UPDATE Fall 2021: I have reopened the office for services for which in-person sessions are necessary. This includes neurofeedback and eye movement therapies. This change also accommodates younger clients, who tend to do better with in-person sessions. Clients desiring services in the office must provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination and wear a N95 or KN95 mask in session.

Each of us will decide when we feel confident enough to begin in-person contact with others. Like many, psychotherapists must weigh the risk to their clients, families, and themselves.

As you consider this question for yourself, the article in the link below will be very useful:
https://erinbromage.wixsite.com/covid19/post/the-risks-know-them-avoid-them.

In his article, Erin Bromage has given a sobering, detailed analysis of the primary ways that people have gotten infected. Some of the main behavioral sources of transmission are toilet flushes, sneezing, coughing, yelling, speaking, and simply breathing. As most are aware and Bromage notes, actions such as touching contaminated surfaces and then touching your face can also transmit the virus.

The most common locations for the transfer of the virus have been in private homes, prisons, religious ceremonies, choirs, indoor sports facilities, and workplaces. Restaurants, parties, and funerals have also been high-risk settings. Curiously, Bromage did not mention hospitals, nursing homes, doctors' offices, and other health care facilities.

Basically, as the work closures are loosened, and we start to venture out more, possibly even resuming in-office activities, you need to look at your environment and make judgments. How many people are here, how much airflow is there around me, and how long will I be in this environment. If you are in an open floor-plan office, you really need critically assess the risk (volume, people, and airflow). If you are in a job that requires face-to-face talking or even worse, yelling, you need to assess the risk.

https://erinbromage.wixsite.com/covid19/post/the-risks-know-them-avoid-them

There is a lot we do not know yet, but it is clear that the risk of contracting COVID-19 will be on-going. For many of my clients and their families, this risk could be life-ending.

I do not believe we will be able to meet safely in an enclosed office for many more months.

It is possible that some therapists will opt for providing talk therapy in outdoor sessions, such as while walking in a park. I will be considering the use of outdoor sessions, although that would require additional safeguards for safety and privacy.

The good news is that teletherapy via video-conferencing is possible and works very well with most forms of psychotherapy. I will continue offering teletherapy.

Neurofeedback conducted in the office with both therapist and client present will likely be impossible for an extended period of time. Clients who wish to purchase or rent a neurofeedback system will be able to do neurofeedback in their own homes with my supervision via video conferencing.

I hope that you and your family are safe and remain healthy. If you, like many of us, have lost family members to COVID-19, I am deeply sorry for your loss. If you have suffered with COVID-19, my heart goes out to you and I wish you a speedy and full recovery.

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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attention deficit disorder (ADD) are common issues for both children and adults. Symptoms may include:

  • narrow focus on the present moment
  • lack of attention to details
  • lack of body awareness and control
  • prone to distraction
  • failure to consider the consequences of behavior
  • difficulty with organization
  • difficulty with sustained projects and following through with chores
  • impulsivity
  • frequent fidgeting or squirming
  • very active, difficulty sitting still
  • talking excessively
  • blurting out answers, not waiting their turn

Individuals with ADHD/ADD often perform poorly in school and in the workplace, even though they may be highly intelligent and creative. These attention issues are often inherited, with the condition appearing in multiple generations of the family.

The most common treatment for ADHD/ADD is medication, but when the medications are stopped, the condition returns. Neurofeedback can be a highly effective alternative because it allows the areas of the brain that control arousal and focus to learn how to self-regulate. Neurofeedback can improve school, sport, and work performance, as well as social skills and self esteem. Unlike medication, the effects of neurofeedback training are often lasting, although occasional "touch-ups" are sometimes necessary in order to maintain the progress.

In this video, a boy who had ADHD describes his experiences before and after training with neurofeedback.

Contact me, if you're wondering whether you or your child might benefit from neurofeedback brain training.

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Military personal sometimes develop symptoms of PTSD as a result of experiencing trauma. This may include experiences such as battle, assault, military sexual trauma, on-the-job injuries, or traffic accidents. Often there have been often multiple jolts, as well as traumatic events from childhood.

This video explains how neurofeedback is being used to treat veterans affected by PTSD. ...continue reading

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