neurofeedback

Each of us will decide when we feel confident enough to begin in-person contact with others. Like many, psychotherapists must weigh the risk to their clients, families, and themselves.

As you consider this question for yourself, the article in the link below will be very useful:
https://erinbromage.wixsite.com/covid19/post/the-risks-know-them-avoid-them.

In his article, Erin Bromage has given a sobering, detailed analysis of the primary ways that people have gotten infected. Some of the main behavioral sources of transmission are toilet flushes, sneezing, coughing, yelling, speaking, and simply breathing. As most are aware and Bromage notes, actions such as touching contaminated surfaces and then touching your face can also transmit the virus.

The most common locations for the transfer of the virus have been in private homes, prisons, religious ceremonies, choirs, indoor sports facilities, and workplaces. Restaurants, parties, and funerals have also been high-risk settings. Curiously, Bromage did not mention hospitals, nursing homes, doctors' offices, and other health care facilities.

Basically, as the work closures are loosened, and we start to venture out more, possibly even resuming in-office activities, you need to look at your environment and make judgments. How many people are here, how much airflow is there around me, and how long will I be in this environment. If you are in an open floor-plan office, you really need critically assess the risk (volume, people, and airflow). If you are in a job that requires face-to-face talking or even worse, yelling, you need to assess the risk.

https://erinbromage.wixsite.com/covid19/post/the-risks-know-them-avoid-them

There is a lot we do not know yet, but it is clear that the risk of contracting COVID-19 will be on-going. For many of my clients and their families, this risk could be life-ending.

I do not believe we will be able to meet safely in an enclosed office for many more months.

It is possible that some therapists will opt for providing talk therapy in outdoor sessions, such as while walking in a park. I will be considering the use of outdoor sessions, although that would require additional safeguards for safety and privacy.

The good news is that teletherapy via video-conferencing is possible and works very well with most forms of psychotherapy. I will continue offering teletherapy.

Neurofeedback conducted in the office with both therapist and client present will likely be impossible for an extended period of time. Clients who wish to purchase or rent a neurofeedback system will be able to do neurofeedback in their own homes with my supervision via video conferencing.

I hope that you and your family are safe and remain healthy. If you, like many of us, have lost family members to COVID-19, I am deeply sorry for your loss. If you have suffered with COVID-19, my heart goes out to you and I wish you a speedy and full recovery.

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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attention deficit disorder (ADD) are common issues for both children and adults. Symptoms may include:

  • narrow focus on the present moment
  • lack of attention to details
  • lack of body awareness and control
  • prone to distraction
  • failure to consider the consequences of behavior
  • difficulty with organization
  • difficulty with sustained projects and following through with chores
  • impulsivity
  • frequent fidgeting or squirming
  • very active, difficulty sitting still
  • talking excessively
  • blurting out answers, not waiting their turn

Individuals with ADHD/ADD often perform poorly in school and in the workplace, even though they may be highly intelligent and creative. These attention issues are often inherited, with the condition appearing in multiple generations of the family.

The most common treatment for ADHD/ADD is medication, but when the medications are stopped, the condition returns. Neurofeedback can be a highly effective alternative because it allows the areas of the brain that control arousal and focus to learn how to self-regulate. Neurofeedback can improve school, sport, and work performance, as well as social skills and self esteem. Unlike medication, the effects of neurofeedback training are often lasting, although occasional "touch-ups" are sometimes necessary in order to maintain the progress.

In this video, a boy who had ADHD describes his experiences before and after training with neurofeedback.

Contact me, if you're wondering whether you or your child might benefit from neurofeedback brain training.

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Military personal sometimes develop symptoms of PTSD as a result of experiencing trauma. This may include experiences such as battle, assault, military sexual trauma, on-the-job injuries, or traffic accidents. Often there have been often multiple jolts, as well as traumatic events from childhood.

This video explains how neurofeedback is being used to treat veterans affected by PTSD. ...continue reading

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This video by EEG Info provides a brief introduction to what neurofeedback is and how it can help you. One of EEG Info's clients, who suffered from severe migraines, describes how neurofeedback has helped her feel better and function at a much higher level. EEG Info staff also talk about a variety of problems that they have successfully treated with neurofeedback. ...continue reading

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